Transitions: Rolling and tumbling into 2019

SunriseCloudsGooding4681Above:Clouds over the Little City

As 2018 became just another fleeting memory, I catalogued a host of quirky new images crossing new lines of experimentation. The new year guarantees more transitions from the traditional to the quirky and beyond

The piece above was made at sunrise from 8 miles into a valley, with an epic thunderstorm building power right behind it. The only road in or out was deeply rutted dirt, guaranteed to turn into deep mud if a gully washer blasted us. But we escaped undrenched with some memorable color to show for it.

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At left: “Big Brother is Watching

An abandoned store, and its watchful eyes guarding the public restroom, serve as  silent reminders of what was-and what is. Captured during an Idaho workshop, this scene, and the one above, demonstrate some of the more unique situations in which a photographer may find him- or herself, both artistically and introspectively.

Introspection doesn’t automatically mean that what we create becomes just our own, hidden behind veils of fear and emptiness. Sometimes, art is the only way we have to express ourselves, when mere words get floundered around, garbled by the incessant monkeys jabbering in our heads or distracted by world or personal events.  Certainly the latter have boosted introspection and uncertainty, as worlds of understanding, innocence, fairness and compassion have been mutilated by the monstrosities taking over our way of life. Some of us will see past the window dressing that appears to make everything shiny and new to uncover the dark, swamp things that live in our very real collective nightmares. Happily, however, we have the choice to ignore the nightmare and embrace the dreams, the dreams that take us deep into remote forests where waterfalls tumble for our delight.

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Above: “Autumn waterfall fog

 And so it will be, as we leave the darkness of 2018 behind and go in search of the light in the new year. Although still dim at the start, 2019 will bring brighter light and joyous laughter as we leave the darkness behind. I’ll be sharing those delights on these pages.

I continue my tradition of donating 20% of the purchase of any of my images to the Idaho
Foodbank. Here’s how it works:
• You get stunning photography for your home, office or as thoughtful gifts; each purchase also helps feed hungry people. I give 20% of each sale to the Idaho Foodbank.
• I will deliver framed art free within a 50-mile radius of Boise. Email me for details at ken@kenlevymedia.com.
• I pay Shipping and Taxes when you buy prints from my galleries at kenlevymedia.com. The donation applies to every print sale I make, large or small.

Here’s where you can view my framed work on exhibit:

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Spring travel 2018 in photos, pt. 1

Part 1 

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Above:The Storm Is Coming,” sunrise near Gooding, ID

Rich in Native American tradition, anchored in its ranching past, Camas County, Idaho and the community of Fairfield are home to the vast Centennial Marsh. Replete with acres of camas lilies prized by the Shoshone-Bannock tribe, the marsh and its environs are invaluable habitat for scores of shorebirds and other winged creatures that call this place their home.

Those winged creatures include mosquitos. Lots of mosquitos. If you come to this magnificent place, bring strong bug spray and use it.

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Away from the marsh, explore the region around Fairfield, including its many antique ranches and farms with abandoned homesteads and ancient barns.

Left:Moonrise, Centennial Marsh



Below:Antiques: Red shack, white trim

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Farther afield, you can access the Big Wood River near Highway 75 or bounce your way along gnarly dirt roads down to the remote Little City of Rocks near Gooding. Bizarre monoliths of stone twist and wriggle their way into the sky, and hiking in the region is magnificent.

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Above:Clouds over the Little City

Below:You Cannot Pass! Mt. Bennett Hills, ID

Sheep dog Sheep Bennett Hills